February 25, 2019

Are you  your brain? How neuroscience transforms us Johanna Pokorny How neuroscientists think about thinking in the lab using complex technologies has profound impacts on how we act in everyday and ordinary ways. This talk will explore how the brain has become viewed as the location of personhood, and how neuroimaging technologies used in neuroscience... Continue Reading →

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January 28, 2019

From Small Groups to Supercities: The Energy that Fuelled Human Transition Simon L'Allier How do we explain that some human groups contain about a hundred individuals, while some cities may be filled with 33 million people? In other primate groups, increases in group size lead to growing competition over food resources and larger energy expenditures... Continue Reading →

November 26, 2018

Growing Old Between Two Worlds: How to Age "Successfully" in the Pacific Vanessa Maloney What does it mean to age 'successfully'? We like to think of ageing as a biological process, but anthropologists have shown through cross-cultural comparison that 'growing old' is profoundly shaped and influenced by our culture. Our ideas surrounding what it means... Continue Reading →

March 28, 2018

Mango Trees and Jealousy Fees: Inequitable Entanglements and Development Aid in Northern Uganda Sarah O'Sullivan This talk explores the recent mushrooming of Village Savings and Loan Associations (VSLAs) in northern Uganda and their impact on post-conflict life, especially for Acholi people living with HIV. In recent years, there has been a large retraction of funding... Continue Reading →

February 28, 2018

Reefer Madness? Facts, Fictions, and Myths about Medical Cannabis Walter Callaghan Is cannabis addictive?  Can cannabis cause schizophrenia?  The answers to these questions are not as simple as are frequently portrayed by psychiatry and addiction counselors, some of whom seem to resort to a form of fear-based messaging that stretches and distorts the available evidence.  This... Continue Reading →

January 31, 2018

Anti-Vax, Pro-White Privilege: Expat Communities as Enclaves of Disease Outbreak in Mexico Sarah Williams Public opinion and discourse within medical institutions often cast “anti-vax” communities as lacking in education and an understanding of the science behind immunology, and situate the burgeoning problem of un- or under-vaccinated children as one that can be solved via mandatory... Continue Reading →

April 19, 2017

Sabr: Pain and Palliation in the Islamic Middle East Elisabeth Feltaous Palliative care and the rhetoric of dying with dignity has proliferated in the past 20 years in the Western world yet progress has been slow in the Middle East.  This talk examines the Human Rights discourse of dying with dignity and contrasts it with... Continue Reading →

March 29, 2017

Constructing Diagnosis Kaitlyn Vleming This talk draws on Kaitlyn's research on polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS) as well as other examples to explore how social-cultural anthropologists look at medical diagnoses. Diagnostic categories are situated in particular historical and social contexts (for example, social ideas about gender permeate categories such as "women's health" or the designation of... Continue Reading →

February 15, 2017

Vandalism or Virtuosity? Graffiti and Archaeology in the Present Samantha Easy This talk explores the history of graffiti in North America and its place in contemporary culture through an archaeological lens. It is an art form that is simultaneously condemned, condoned, illegal, legal and widely familiar to many of us. This talk asks us to... Continue Reading →

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